For tissue approximation and ligation, surgeons use different types of sutures. Among the most common ones, we can include the Vicryl suture and the Prolene suture. Although they do not feature similar characteristics, both of these sutures have indisputable advantages.

 

Vicryl is an absorbable suture manufactured by Ethicon Inc. It is a synthetic and sterile surgical suture that can be used in ophthalmic procedures, but not in cardiovascular or neurological procedures. Prolene, on the other hand, is a non-absorbable suture that can be used in this type of procedures, as well.

 

The Vicryl suture presents the advantage of being completely absorbed within two months after the surgery. One of its versions, the Vicryl Rapide suture can be absorbed even faster. Vicryl contains polyglycolic acid. Besides this acid, some Vicryl sutures can also be treated with substances that offer antimicrobial protection.

 

The Prolene suture is indicated for a number of wound closures and is very resistant. It is made of polypropylene and is dyed blue, to allow surgeons to work with it easily when they operate a patient. Humans are not the only ones that can benefit from Prolene sutures; animals can have their wounds stitched with this kind of sutures, as well.

 

Whether they work with Vicryl or Prolene, surgeons need to know the procedures that involve absorbable or non-absorbable sutures before employing one of these sutures for  skin or tissue closure. Also, after stitching a wound with sutures, appropriate procedures have to be followed.

 

To be 100% effective, wounds have to be stitched properly. For this, the surgeon needs to know how to handle the needle and how to stitch. Surgeons need a lot of practice before using sutures on an actual patient. Luckily, the years spent in college are, usually, worth it.

 

Suture manufacturers provide them in a variety of lengths, with needles included in the package. After they reach the hospital or clinic that has ordered them, they are carefully stored for further use. Specific temperature and light conditions are mandatory for sutures to preserve their characteristics.

 

There are no adverse reactions to having your wound stitched with a suture or another. The only problem that can occur is the one generated by a surgeon who does not know how to handle the needle or stitch a wound properly. This can lead to infections or inflammations.

 

All sutures are provided sterile. If, however, a package is opened and its contents not used, the entire package has to be discarded. Suture manufacturers recommend hospitals and clinics they do not resterilize sutures.

 

Latest studies regarding the procedure of stitching with sutures show that there is a tendency of reducing needle diameter with the purpose of making this procedure less invasive. The smaller the needle diameter, the less blood coming out of the patient’s body.

 

For tissue approximation and ligation, surgeons use different types of sutures. Among the most common ones, we can include the Vicryl suture and the Prolene suture. Although they do not feature similar characteristics, both of these sutures have indisputable advantages.

 

Vicryl is an absorbable suture manufactured by Ethicon Inc. It is a synthetic and sterile surgical suture that can be used in ophthalmic procedures, but not in cardiovascular or neurological procedures. Prolene, on the other hand, is a non-absorbable suture that can be used in this type of procedures, as well.

 

The Vicryl suture presents the advantage of being completely absorbed within two months after the surgery. One of its versions, the Vicryl Rapide suture can be absorbed even faster. Vicryl contains polyglycolic acid. Besides this acid, some Vicryl sutures can also be treated with substances that offer antimicrobial protection.

 

The Prolene suture is indicated for a number of wound closures and is very resistant. It is made of polypropylene and is dyed blue, to allow surgeons to work with it easily when they operate a patient. Humans are not the only ones that can benefit from Prolene sutures; animals can have their wounds stitched with this kind of sutures, as well.

 

Whether they work with Vicryl or Prolene, surgeons need to know the procedures that involve absorbable or non-absorbable sutures before employing one of these sutures for  skin or tissue closure. Also, after stitching a wound with sutures, appropriate procedures have to be followed.

 

To be 100% effective, wounds have to be stitched properly. For this, the surgeon needs to know how to handle the needle and how to stitch. Surgeons need a lot of practice before using sutures on an actual patient. Luckily, the years spent in college are, usually, worth it.

 

Suture manufacturers provide them in a variety of lengths, with needles included in the package. After they reach the hospital or clinic that has ordered them, they are carefully stored for further use. Specific temperature and light conditions are mandatory for sutures to preserve their characteristics.

 

There are no adverse reactions to having your wound stitched with a suture or another. The only problem that can occur is the one generated by a surgeon who does not know how to handle the needle or stitch a wound properly. This can lead to infections or inflammations.

 

All sutures are provided sterile. If, however, a package is opened and its contents not used, the entire package has to be discarded. Suture manufacturers recommend hospitals and clinics they do not resterilize sutures.

 

Latest studies regarding the procedure of stitching with sutures show that there is a tendency of reducing needle diameter with the purpose of making this procedure less invasive. The smaller the needle diameter, the less blood coming out of the patient’s body.

 

Searching for needle sutures that comply with all current requirements and that are designed to help patients feel less pain when they recover after surgery? Consider the Vicryl suture ( http://www.sosmedicalsuperstore.com/ )or the Prolene suture ( http://www.sosmedicalsuperstore.com/ )  that you can find at our online store. Besides sutures, we also trade post operative garments, accessories and instruments.